Monthly Archives: June 2018

Lordosis

Posted on June 22, 2018 by

Lordosis is located in your neck and spine. Cervical lordosis is when there is an inward curve in the region of your neck. When there is an inward curve in your lower back, it is known as lumbar lordosis. It is more common for an individual to have lumbar lordosis than cervical lordosis. Obesity, osteoporosis, poor posture, spondylolisthesis, and kyphosis are a few causes of lordosis. Someone who does not have this condition would notice their ears are lined up over their hips, shoulders, and ankles.

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Individuals who experience lordosis would have a noticeable curve that could be seen. In addition, they might experience discomfort, severe back pain and/or tense muscles around the curve. Lordosis could restrict their movements and create a space in between their neck or lower back and the floor when they are laying down.

Physical therapy can help with strengthening, and increase your flexibility and range of motion for your neck and spine. Exercising, stretching, using extra pillows when you go to sleep to support your spine, and wearing a neck immobilizer or thoracic spine brace are all possible treatment options for lordosis.

Kyphosis

Posted on June 18, 2018 by

A healthy spine is made up of vertebrae that look like cylinders put on top of one another to form a column. Kyphosis is when the vertebrae in the upper back is more wedge shaped, which leads to an excessive, forward rounding of the back.  It can appear in infants or teens, but it is most commonly found in older women.

Kyphosis

In addition to an abnormal curvature of the spine, someone who has mild kyphosis can experience back pain and stiffness. Fractures, disk degeneration, birth defects, osteoporosis, cancer and cancer treatments can all lead to an abnormal vertebrae. Kyphosis is linked to weak back muscles and an individual can have difficulty walking, driving, and looking up. Pain can also be felt when the individual lies down and there can be problems with breathing and digestion if the situation is severe. Depending on the individual’s age and the cause, the treatment can vary for each individual.

Ankle Rehabilitation

Posted on June 6, 2018 by

Ankle sprains are a common injury that can lead to severe pain and weakness. We can work on various rehabilitation exercises to help our ankle heal and prevent future injuries.

After the injury has occurred, it is important to perform partial weight bearing to prevent muscle atrophy. When you are able to walk again without limping, you can work on full weight bearing. You should begin with range of motion exercises, such as plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion. You should not feel pain when you perform these ankle movements. You can then practice writing the alphabet with your toe and work on towel assisted stretches with the same ankle movements.

Image result for ankle movements plantar flexion               Image result for ankle movements inversion

Next, you can do strengthening exercises, such as performing the ankle movements against the wall or using a rubber tubing looped around your feet for resistance. After, you can move on to balance exercises on a wobble board by doing a double leg stand with eyes opened and then closed. Then, standing on your injured foot with eyes opened and then closed. 

By following these rehabilitation steps, you can help strengthen the ankle and prevent an injury from occurring again.

Vitamins

Posted on June 1, 2018 by

There are different kinds of vitamins that are essential for a healthy body, such as vitamins A, B12, C, E, and K.

Vitamin A is an antioxidant. It is important for our vision, it keeps our tissues and skin healthy, and has an important role in the immune system and in bone growth. Retinoids and carotenoids are two forms of vitamin A. Retinoids can be found in eggs, shrimp, fish, and cheddar cheese. Carotenoids can be found in sweet potatoes, carrots, and spinach.

Vitamin B12 can provide nerve cell protection and it assists with the production of red blood cells. A diet that includes meat, poultry, milk, cheese, fish, and fortified soymilk will provide us with vitamin B12.

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Vitamin C is an antioxidant. When we consume foods that are rich in vitamin C, it can decrease the risk of mouth, stomach, and breast cancer. In addition, it is needed for the synthesis of collagen which supports blood vessel walls and helps heal wounds. Fruits, fruit juices, broccoli, bell peppers, strawberries, potatoes, and tomatoes are all good sources of vitamin C.

Vitamin E is another antioxidant. Consuming a vitamin E rich diet may help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Vegetable oils, leafy green vegetables, nuts, and whole grains are excellent sources of vitamin E.

Vitamin K can help with blood clotting and may help prevent hip fractures. Vitamin K can be found in eggs, milk, cabbage, spinach, liver, broccoli, and other green vegetables.